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Photo from TechCrunch

The Ticketing Frontier: The Good, The Bad, and the Not So Pretty

While the digital world is making it more accessible and streamlined for tickets to be sold online, it is not without its share of problems. The ticketing world is ever changing, for the good and the bad. Technology has made it easier to streamline the entrance process, sell tickets to a wider audience, and provided more insights than ever before. However, it has also created new ways for fraud to be committed, brought on new security concerns, and new players taking advantage of the system.

The XLIVE Conference this year is taking place November 17 - 20, 2019 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada. In preparation, we will be highlighting the various sessions that will be taking place throughout the conference. Continuing our series in diving into the featured sessions we will be looking at the following: The Ticketing Frontier: The Good, The Bad, and the Not So Pretty hosted by Willie Litvack the CEO of SquadUp on Monday, November 18 from 4:40 pm - 5:30 pm. 

While the digital world is making it more accessible and streamlined for tickets to be sold online, it is not without its share of problems. The ticketing world is ever changing, for the good and the bad. Technology has made it easier to streamline the entrance process, sell tickets to a wider audience, and provided more insights than ever before. However, it has also created new ways for fraud to be committed, brought on new security concerns, and new players taking advantage of the system. 

Faster Entry 

RFID has been one of the biggest game changers in the ticket industry in the past few years. It not only helps to expedite entry but it provides live event organizers with more information about attendees then ever before. This data can be used to provide powerful analytics that can help improve event operations. 

In 2015, the music festival Snowglobe switched to RFID and saw massive improvements. They were able to scan in more than 20 people per minute at each gate. Even when the team experiences a power outage, and temperatures so cold that phones were not functioning properly, they were still able to continue to scan guests in since the RFID readers did not need to connect to a central source. 

“With Eventbrite’s RFID solution, everything changed for the better. Entry was much cleaner, much more efficient, and we caught many more people trying to scam. We got all the advantages that we wanted when we made the decision to spend more money on the attendee experience.RFID sped up the box office process in two ways- because people already had their wristbands, it freed up time and space. And because people received such extensive information on how RFID works in advance, they could come to the office with more informed questions, which streamlined the entire process" Jeffrey Lesan the CMO, of SnowGlobe told Eventbrite.

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Not only can RFID expedite entry, it can also help reduce lines at food and drink stands. By implementing a cashless system can help drastically cut down service times and even increase and events bottom line. It also provides added security by reducing the need for ATMs on site. Less security is required when events do not have as much or no cash on the grounds. 

The Secondary Ticketing Market

In the ticketing world, the secondary market is a mess. Scalpers adding huge markups in order to turn large profits is a major pain point along with ticket fraud. At its peak, the secondary market was valued to be worth $10 to $15 billion, two to three times the size of the primary market it was based on. Through new technology and regulation, the issues with the secondary market are becoming the focus of many in the ticketing industry. 

“In 2019, I see the ticketing industry continuing to grapple with the challenges of the secondary market and how to invest enough in core technologies to keep up. The overseas markets are being aggressive by passing legislation which protects the consumer and the venue — hopefully the ticketing industry can find ways to collaborate with lawmakers to create real change,”Autumn Kiser, VP of Ticket Sales and Marketing for Playhouse Square says to Access.

Introducing blockchain technology could potentially eliminate brokers and fight against fraud. A ticket comes with a fixed price and set of rules when it is created on blockchain so that ridiculous price hikes are prevented. Each ticket is unique and represents a contract between the fan and the event organizer. Not only can it improve the broken parts of the process but it can also elevate it by allowing activations to be created and engage fans in new ways.

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Photo from Event Presser

Another solution is to combine the primary and secondary market to create a more streamlined ticket buying experience for fans.This will create a single purchase flow that can also show and advanced row by row seat views. The process will hopefully give consumers more transparency when purchasing.

“For us, it’s all the train tracks coming together,” Brian Peunic, AXS senior vice president of sports tells Sports Business Daily. “We think it’s a big deal to remove as many barriers and allow a fan to purchase in a single flow like this.”

Social Media 

Selling tickets within social media platforms has become increasingly popular. More conversions happen when an event can sell directly to a consumer without them having to leave the application that they are in. For example, a live event organizers can create a Facebook event and then potential attendees can purchase tickets right there.  Instagram has even added a button so that tickets can be sold directly from a profile page. This can help to expand the awareness of live events and help to increase ticket sales. It will also help to make tickets more accessible to a wider range of internet users.

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Photo from Eventbrite

As new technology continues to emerge in the ticketing space, both new solutions and problems have arisen. RFID and other technologies have helped to make the process of checking tickets more seamless for both the event organizer and attendees. Blockchain is predicted to be the next wave of technology to help improve the process and fight against fraud. The secondary market will also continue to be a topic of discussion as the ticket industry tries to find solutions that satisfy both consumers and sellers. Social media has already begun to integrate itself into the ticketing space to create a seamless experience for users. Predictions show that this will rise as more platforms get involved.

To learn more, be sure to attend The Ticketing Frontier: The Good, The Bad, and the Not So Pretty hosted by Willie Litvack the CEO of SquadUp on Monday, November 18 from 4:40 pm - 5:30 pm.

TAGS: Ticketing
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