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Kim Thayil attends Soundgarden - Live from the Artists Den at The Wiltern in Los Angeles (Credit - Colin Young-Wolff for Artists Den) 2.jpg

'Soundgarden: Live From the Artists Den' - Immersive Concert Re-Creation

The Artists Den, the critically acclaimed television and music series known for presenting intimate concerts, had a unique concert experience in store for New Yorkers and Los Angelites this week.

The Artists Den, the critically acclaimed television and music series known for presenting intimate concerts, had a unique concert experience in store for New Yorkers and Los Angelites this week.  Soundgarden’s 2013 tour ended with a show at the Wiltern in Los Angeles, which was filmed as part of the Live From the Artists Den series.

Since the passing of front man Chris Cornell (Soundgarden, Audioslave), The Artists Den had received countless notes from fans, asking if it was possible to bring this concert back to life, in its entirety.

Soundgarden - Live from the Artists Den at The Wiltern in Los Angeles (Credit - Colin Young-Wolff for Artists Den).jpg

The Artists Den partnered with L-Acoustics to bring the live experience of that show back for fans.  The team recreated that night with 360 audio, on five massive projector screens, and played the recordings in concert venues to recreate the 2013 event.  The Brooklyn show had all the vibes of a traditional concert, with merch & beer for sale, concert Ts in the audience, photos and videos, singing, dancing, head banging, and smoke in the air.

How Was the Experience?

This experience was extremely unique for the XLIVE team.  Never had we been in a concert venue, hearing a live performance on a professional sound system, and watched a pre-filmed concert on such a large, theater size screen.  The five projectors added dimension, as attendees were able to watch front man Chris Cornell on the center projector, the guitarist and drummer on the screens on either side, and then the bassist and other venue shots on the two final screens.  The shots of the five screens were constantly changing.

Soundgarden - Live from the Artists Den at Brooklyn Steel in New York (Credit - Joe Papeo for Artists Den) 4.jpg

Fans will love to experience their favorite bands and artists in a format like this.  Seeing the performance through on-stage cameras, on a massive screen, standing in a concert venue with smoke machines, lights, and having the recording played through the venue’s sound system made for a great experience.  The end result?  Something between a concert, and a watch/listening party. 

Although you can never fully recreate the real performance, the immersive concert had camera angles which you would have never been able to see at the live show, and since the sound was recorded pre-mixed, it was even easier to hear.

What’s Next?

Expect more concerts to be filmed with the intent of having the recording edited and used in immersive experiences like this.  More cameras capturing more angles, allows for the re-creation experience to be better.  The Soundgarden experience was filmed without knowing about this immersive experience, which shows that future possibilities are endless.

With 360-degree and 3D cameras becoming more common, we can also expect to see these technologies utilized to further help recreate concert experiences for fans.  It wouldn’t surprise us to see bands such as the Rolling Stones, who are on what may be their final tour, film one of their shows with an immersive re-creation in mind, so that fans will be able to enjoy the closest thing to a real concert, for the rest of their lives.

Soundgarden - Live from the Artists Den at Brooklyn Steel in New York (Credit - Joe Papeo for Artists Den) 3.jpg

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